ENG 523: Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare’s Language

2018-06-18T21:19:29+05:00

A survey of Shakespeare’s linguistic resources, from several standpoints: the history of the language, the art of rhetoric, problems of attribution (including the potentials of computational stylometrics), and poetics.

http://commons.princeton.edu/shakespeares-language/

Borderland: Reporting on the front lines of history in Greece

2018-07-27T01:05:40+05:00

In June and July 2017,  students traveled to Athens and the island of Lesbos, notebooks and cameras in hand, to serve as eyewitnesses at a pivotal moment in world affairs. Their challenging assignment: Produce a compelling and rigorous first rough draft of history.

http://commons.princeton.edu/globalreporting2017/

Migration Reporting: Manitoba

2018-07-18T00:10:14+05:00

This seminar will focus on journalism and the global migration crisis, as more than 65 million people are on the move, with forced displacements at a record high. At the same time, refugee resettlement in the United States is contentious. This course examines journalism’s approach to the crisis in photos, text, and radio, considering the conflict between national security, international responsibility, and America’s historic role in resettlement.

Architecture, Globalization and the Environment

2018-06-18T21:21:17+05:00

Art 250, Architecture, Globalization, and the Environment, analyzes contemporary architecture and its relation to climate change, urbanism, and consequent social problems. Special attention is paid to the erosion of public space, whether due to gentrification, gated communities, outright segregation, or to the devastating impact of war in urban zones in many parts of the world.

Introduction to Asian-American Studies: Race, War, Decolonization

2018-08-29T19:44:23+05:00

This course offers an introduction to Asian American studies centered on the issues of “race,” “privilege,” and “power” from the premise that multiple racial projects—including Orientalism, Islamophobia, anti-Black racism, and settler colonialism—contribute to Asian racial formation, and that warfare plays a central role in these projects. With a focus on militarism in the US, Asia, and the Pacific region, the class explores the intersections of race, Indigeneity, and class as well as possibilities for making connections across variegated groups. Exploring Asian Americanism through archives, personal narratives, and other texts, the course focuses on the role of history in producing current conditions and our understandings of them.

Local Reporting: Paris as a Case Study

2018-06-18T21:22:17+05:00

This course examines what makes certain spaces — a multi-ethnic suburb of Paris, a museum, or a building — more controversial or problematic than others. Students produce a body of journalistic work based on historical and archival research, interviews, investigation, and field work in Paris during spring break.

http://commons.princeton.edu/pariscasestudy/

Sonic Cinema

2018-06-18T21:22:34+05:00

This course explores the use of sound in relation to moving images, including film scoring, musicals, soundtracks, music videos, and experimental sound and video art. Significant attention is devoted to digital technology and media soundscapes. Several questions are addressed in the course: How does sound reinforce regimes of audiovisual representation? How does it disrupt them? To what political ends do artists deploy sound, music, and noise? What role does technology play in their effectiveness? Screenings range from Hollywood blockbusters and immersive media to fine art, video games, and independent cinema.

http://commons.princeton.edu/soniccinema/

Anthropology of Media

2018-07-27T01:13:54+05:00

This course introduces the media as an arena for anthropology by exploring how media texts and technologies are embedded in social forces and cultural values. The course reveals the assumptions about reality that frame representations of cultural difference and social inequality in documentary films, track the global circulation of mass media, and examines how indigenous societies have taken up media-making as a means of cultural production and politics. By studying media from anthropology’s comparative and ethnographic perspectives, students learn to identify and describe the diverse and potent relationships between media and social life.