EPICS

2019-07-03T22:55:07+05:00

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering    public

EPICS was founded at Purdue in 2005 and introduced at Princeton University in Fall 2006 by co-founder Professor Ed Coyle *82.  EPICS is a unique program in which teams of undergraduates are designing, building, and deploying real systems to solve engineering-based problems for local community service and education organizations.  At Princeton, the Keller Center partners with Program for Community-Engaged Scholarship (ProCES) to provide students with this hands-on multi-disciplinary learning experience.

 

Studio 455 – Visible Evidence: Documentary Film and Data Visualization

2019-06-28T23:58:18+05:00

The Studio 455 website features cource assignments and other iformation, serves as a resource of documentary films used in the course, supports the addition of time-coded, student annotations to those films, and hosts student writings and multimedia project work.

Korean Travel Narratives, 1100s – 1930s

2018-07-18T00:22:58+05:00

Knowledge about the world transformed over history: civilization, empire, East-West encounter, and postcolonial homelessness are frames that link identity and space. Reading travelogues by Koreans and about Korea, this course attempts to analyze the epistemic coordinates of travelogue that produces knowledge about self and other and to note the changing historical contexts around Korea, which defined the modes of mobility for shipwreck survivors, prisoners of war, Christian missionaries, Japanese colonial officials, and communist guerilla fighters.

Women and Religion in America

2019-07-03T23:37:08+05:00

This course explores the dynamics of religion, gender, and power in American religious history, with case studies of women in a variety of traditions. Student’s final digital history project (e.g. podcast, online museum exhibition, Wikipedia page, digital oral history, audio walking tour, digitized primary source)  contribute to a collaborative digital exhibition.

Soviet Culture, Above and Below Ground

2018-11-20T15:44:48+05:00

This interdisciplinary survey explores Soviet literature, art, theater, and film after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The course focuses on major cultural topics in and around the increasing pressure of shifting political landscapes, ideology, propaganda, the publishing market, and the role of the writer in Russian society.