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Indigenous Brazil

2019-06-28T23:57:22-04:00

The poem “TOTEM”, by André Vallias, served as an initial guide to the course. Each student chose one of the names of the indigenous people cited in the poem to research and write about it. The result of this research were contributed to the “TOTEM BLOG”, a collection of texts produced by each of the students about their people, as well as through the tags on the home page.

International News: Migration Reporting

2019-06-28T23:57:37-04:00

Students in this course reported on immigration and refugee policy and practice across borders, with a focus on the conflict between national security, international responsibility, and America and Canada’s historical roles in resettlement. Trips to Canada (Toronto and Winnipeg) and Connecticut will gave students opportunities to report from the field.

American Dissent

2019-06-28T23:57:45-04:00

This Writing Seminar explored the achievements — and limits — of social movements and ideas opposed to the status quo. Students analyzed Frederick Douglass’s 1852 speech about the meaning of Independence Day, examined historical, architectural, and financial perspectives on the Woodstock Music and Art Fair of 1969 and conducted their own research projects investigating an act, movement, or theory of dissent of their own choosing.

OtherFutures 2018, An introduction to modern Caribbean literature

2018-07-18T00:15:55-04:00

This course introduces students to major theories and debates within the study of Caribbean literature and culture with a particular focus on the idea of catastrophe. Reading novels and poetry that address the historical loss and injustices that have given shape to the modern Caribbean, students explore questions of race, gender, and sexuality and pay considerable attention to the figure of the black body caught in the crosscurrents of a catastrophic history. A course website serves as a virtual exhibition space for the course.

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