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Hidden History of Hollywood

2021-01-04T09:51:47-05:00
“Only the colored people themselves can determine their political, social and economical future.” William Monroe Trotter
This course uncovers the roots of racial injustice in Hollywood; the secret, but cardinal role Woodrow Wilson played in the production and distribution of D. W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation that led directly to the rebirth of the KKK and increased violence against Afro-Americans; and William Monroe Trotter’s fight against the state propaganda film. Wilson’s policy of segregation was adapted by Hollywood as a self-censoring industry regulation of representation. Black people could only appear on screen as subservient and marginal characters, never as equals, partners or leaders. This code, Wilson’s legacy, has become second nature to Hollywood.

Cinema in Times of Pandemic

2021-01-04T09:51:33-05:00
This new Princeton University course is dedicated to the study of critical film curation.
The pandemic brought a total disruption to traditional film production, distribution, curation and canonization. Could this disruption be turned into a creative subversion of the strong industrial and commercial aspect of American filmmaking? The formation of the American film canon is an ongoing struggle between civil rights activism and a Jim Crow system of representation. The responsibility of film studies is to assist this creative struggle with sophisticated and open minded film curation and canon formation. With a readiness to be inspired by the unfamiliar from systemically injured and overlooked groups, this studio course will give students the opportunity to practice these virtues by curating brand new films, some not yet distributed, as well as unacknowledged, undistributed classics.

https://commons.princeton.edu/ctp

 

Structures and the Urban Environment

2020-08-25T17:49:38-04:00

One of the most classic courses at Princeton University, CEE262, Structures in the Urban Environment (known as “Bridges”) was founded by Professor David Billington (1927-2018) in 1974.  The course argues that the best designed structures (bridges, buildings, and vaults) are a work of art – structural art – the art of the structural engineer.  The course integrates humanities with engineering through studies of cultures, people, and art as reflected in works of structural engineering.

 

Spanish for a Medical Mission in Ecuador

2020-08-25T17:49:46-04:00

Spanish for a Medical Mission to Ecuador is an interdisciplinary initiative to bridge health education, humanitarian engagement, and the Spanish language. The mission of this course is to provide twelve Princeton undergraduate students an unparalleled exposure to global health policies and health care through hands-on work in health clinics in Ecuador during Spring Break. A blog developed in collaboration with the McGraw center for Teaching and Learning provided a shared space to document the experience.