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IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework)

2020-09-25T12:25:07-04:00

The IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework) standard opens up a landscape of new opportunities for working with media in coursework.  The McGraw Center has partnered with faculty, the University Library, the Princeton Art Museum, and the Visual Resources Collection in the department of Art & Archaeology, to take advantage of this standard.

Mirador integration in Canvas

Mirador is a popular , open-source web-based, multi-window image viewing platform with the ability to zoom, display, compare and annotate image collections from institutions around the world and here on campus.  The McGraw Center offers an implementation of the Mirador Image Viewer asa tool integration (LTI) with the Canvas course management system.

Course collections in McGraw Commons (WordPress)

A plugin developed for the McGraw Commons, McGraw’s WordPress platform for course blogs, allows IIIF image collection “manifests” to be added to the Media Library of any course blog and individual images from those collections to be embedded in student blog posts.

Tannowa Collection: The Kyoto Princeton Project

2020-09-25T10:43:49-04:00

Kyoto University and Princeton University have initiated a joint project in March 2020 in order to deepen the knowledge and awareness of Japanese history and culture throughout the world. The goal is to disseminate images, transcriptions, translations, and research about Japanese documents owned by the Kyoto University Museum.

The first set of documents that are translated are 53 records of the Tannowa collection. They cover the period from the early thirteenth through the early sixteenth century, and provide insight into the actions of the Tannowa, a warrior family who resided in the eponymous Tannowa estate in Izumi province. This collection is unique in that it provides, in great detail, evidence for the actions of the warriors of the central provinces near Kyoto, which rarely survive. These document reveal much about social and political conditions during the turbulent fourteenth century, when wars were fought between the Northern and Southern courts in Izumi from 1331 through 1392. The most remarkable documents in this collection include edicts from chancelleries of the noble Kujō house. In addition, a series of documents by Kusunoki Masanori, found in scroll two, are noteworthy, as are records from Ashikaga Takauji, the founder of Japan’s second warrior government. Finally, the latest documents recount the Tannowa during wars of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries as well.

https://komonjo.princeton.edu/tannowa/

Crowdsourcing Trenton

2020-09-25T10:38:52-04:00

Crowdsourcing Trenton is a project related to the Trenton Project, a project researching topics relating to the history of Trenton in the 1960s. Members of the Trenton community who might have insight into the events that took place in Trenton during the 1960’s and the people involved with those events, are invited to contribute information. Over the past several years, the Trenton project has collected hundreds of photos from dozens of sources. The images we’ve found have told us much about Trenton in the 1960s and answered many questions about the events of April 1968, the main focus of our work. But some photos raise further questions.

https://commons.princeton.edu/harlan-joseph/

History Beyond the Written Word: Unconventional Historical Sources and The Historian’s Craft

2020-09-25T10:44:56-04:00

In History Beyond the Written Word: Unconventional Historical Sources and The Historian’s Craft. History 278 (Spring 2015), students conducted oral history interviews and collected other materials, researching history using  unconventional sources.

Playing Soviet: The Visual Languages of Early Soviet Children’s Books, 1917-1953

2020-09-25T10:48:49-04:00

The Playing Soviet website presents an interactive database of children’s book illustrations drawn from little-known and rarely-seen Soviet children’s books from the collection of the Cotsen Collection at Princeton’s Firestone Library. The website supports image annotation, allowing students to contribute to the site, and data exports, enabling the development of data visualizations based on information in the archive.

Princeton Geniza Project

2020-09-25T10:49:10-04:00

The Princeton Geniza Project website hosts approximately 4500 TEI-encoded transcriptions of Judeo-Arabic textual fragments. The archive has been used for decades as a scholarly research, teaching, and learning resource.  In 2016, the newly-created Princeton Geniza Lab in Frist Campus Center, is working with staff members from the McGraw Center to update and standardize the database.

HIS278: Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories

2020-09-25T10:44:48-04:00

Students in the Spring 2016, HIS278, Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories course produced digital narratives using ESRI’s online StoryMaps application. Based on recorded interviews conducted by the Historical Society of Princeton, images from the Society’s archives, census records, and digital maps held in Princeton University’s Maps and Geospatial Information Center, these multimedia narratives tell stories about the lives of residents of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood in Princeton.