“Only the colored people themselves can determine their political, social and economic future.”

William Monroe Trotter

Research Film Studio

Prof. EA Kiss

This course uncovers the roots of racial injustice in Hollywood; the secret, but cardinal role Woodrow Wilson played in the production and distribution of D. W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation that led directly to the rebirth of the KKK and increased violence against Afro-Americans; and William Monroe Trotter’s fight against the state propaganda film. Wilson’s policy of segregation was adapted by Hollywood as a self-censoring industry regulation of representation. Black people could only appear on screen as subservient and marginal characters, never as equals, partners or leaders. This code, Wilson’s legacy, has become second nature to Hollywood.

03/09

Leading Men and Leading Ladies: Jim Crow Cinema

Sul-Te-Wan museum vitrine; Julie Dash museum vitrine; film essay and/or film montage on Sul-Te Van and on the origins of various Hollywood stereotypes

The first Afro-American woman on the big screen

Madame Sul-Te-Wan

Gone with the Wind

Victor Fleming and George Cukor

(1939)

Casablanca

Michael Curtiz

(1944)

Illusions

Julie Dash

(1982)

Four Women

Julie Dash

(1975)

“Stereotypes” in Public Opinion

Walter Lippmann

(1920)

Website concept and design: Erika A. Kiss & Sabi

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