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Author: mfleurba

Feminism: Where it’s Going, How it Will Help and When a World of Postfeminism Is Acceptable, by Tea Wimer

Feminism: Where it’s Going, How it Will Help and When a World of Postfeminism Is Acceptable, by Tea Wimer

As Beyoncé explained in her hit single “***Flawless”, a feminist is one that “ believes in the social / Political, and economic equality of the sexes”. It would naturally make sense, then, that a postfeminist world would be one in which this social, political and economic equality is achieved. In their introduction to the anthology, “Interrogating Postfeminism”, Yvonne Tasker and Diane Negra defined postfeminism as: “Postfeminist culture works in part to incorporate assume or naturalize aspects of feminism… postfeminist culture…

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Equality and Religious Freedom, by Caleb South

Equality and Religious Freedom, by Caleb South

Religion is in the news constantly in the modern world, both for good and for ill. In the United States, the public influence of religion is attested in venues ranging from presidential debates to internet memes, and its effects include fears over terrorism and reports of prejudice as well as heartwarming stories of charity, acts of solidarity, and the enduring popularity of Pope Francis. Despite these positive aspects, the fact that religion continues to be linked to so much violence…

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Looking to the Future: A Cooperative Approach to Equality in Global Health, by Michael Zhou

Looking to the Future: A Cooperative Approach to Equality in Global Health, by Michael Zhou

Nowadays, many are concerned with the unequal distribution of global health care standards in the developing world due to the actions of drug manufacturers. Historically, the problems associated with global health have been exacerbated by globalization of the pharmaceutical industry, which had often sacrificed drug efficacy and safety for quick profits even through economic and social exploitation. As demonstrated by studies like that of Michael Kremer (2002), the high prices of many essential pharmaceutical drugs developed by multinational firms often restrict…

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Our Role in the Fight to End Terrorism Once and for All in the 21st Century , by Belinda Azamati

Our Role in the Fight to End Terrorism Once and for All in the 21st Century , by Belinda Azamati

Terrorism; the use of life-endangering violence for the purpose of gaining attention and promoting a group’s political agenda. Although more media coverage has been devoted to the terrorist attacks of the twenty-first century, terrorism itself is no new phenomenon folks. It is simply society’s definition of terrorism that has altered with time. There have been countless groups throughout history, from all religious and national origins, that have engaged in terrorist acts as a means of addressing their grievances, attacking a…

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A Love Letter to Home Ec, by Elizabeth Wright

A Love Letter to Home Ec, by Elizabeth Wright

Food is our simplest, most immediate need. It is nonnegotiable, and a common thread amongst all humans regardless of location, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation. Everyone eats. But for many years, food has taken a backseat in politics to other issues, while the food systems in the United States continued to fail both the people producing it and the people consuming it. Our current system of food production is a lose-lose in every imaginable way: it is unhealthier,…

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Methods of Combating Censorship: A Social Progress Perspective, by Casey Chow

Methods of Combating Censorship: A Social Progress Perspective, by Casey Chow

If we actually look at how our civilization progresses, the one thing that has invariably enabled societies to progress has been increased connections among and within nations. Take a look at the rise of cell phones in many African countries, which has left some 83% of Ghanaians, for example, equipped with these marvelous devices (Pew). Not only does this allow for increased communication amongst family members or even community, but cellular communication has also enabled Ghanaians to exchange money over…

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Should You Be Forced to Wear a Seatbelt? : Exploring the Limits of Bodily Autonomy, by Simi Prasad

Should You Be Forced to Wear a Seatbelt? : Exploring the Limits of Bodily Autonomy, by Simi Prasad

Is the government in the position to dictate whether or not a woman should be permitted to get an abortion? Is it an infringement of autonomy for the state to prohibit the consumption of drugs, even though they have been proven harmful? Is it ethical for a corpse to abstain from donating its organs to someone in need? Should a terminally ill patient have the right to end his or her own life through euthanasia? Is it the responsibility of…

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The Goals of a Healthcare System, by Benjamin Jacobson

The Goals of a Healthcare System, by Benjamin Jacobson

How can we improve healthcare and attain the best possible system of medical care? This is a quite difficult question in its own right, but attempts to answer it are further impeded by the fact that we must first qualify what an improvement is and develop a clear concept of what the goals of a healthcare system should be. At its core, it seems simple enough to state that an ideal healthcare system provides the best possible healthcare to the…

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The Modern Legitimization of Islamophobia, by Stephanie Ward

The Modern Legitimization of Islamophobia, by Stephanie Ward

The rampant Islamophobia currently present in the United States is no new phenomenon. While we often pinpoint its beginnings to the events of September 11, 2001, the current discrimination towards Muslims is a situation that has been repeated many times throughout American history with various cultural or racial groups. According to En-Chieh Chao of National Sun Yat-sen University, “from the ‘savage Black’, the ‘inverted Jew’, or the ‘Monkey Men’ Japanese, the ‘devious Communists’ to Barbarian Muslims’, it is always ‘them’…

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Imagine a world where…, by Miriam Buscher

Imagine a world where…, by Miriam Buscher

 Imagine a world where: Humans contribute less than the 57% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from burning fossil fuels they create now (overall decreasing pollution and helping to mitigate climate change) More people have independent access to clean and sustainable energy, reducing the current number of1.4 billion people who don’t have any access to electricity right now Expenses for importing fossil fuels are reduced Human health is improved globally Energy security is advanced and… Numerous jobs are created[1] Sounds too…

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