FRS101: Facebook: The Social Impact of Social Networks

2018-07-19T20:08:02+00:00

This course examines the social impact of social media sites such as Facebook, and how they have changed communication patterns, and expectations of privacy.

Students used the site to comment on course readings, various social networks, and their experience with new forms of social networking.

Instructor: Edward Felten, Center for Information Technology Policy and Computer Science and Public Affairs.

COS436/ELE469: Human-Computer Interface Technology

2018-06-18T21:32:28+00:00

This course introduces hardware and software technologies employed in the creation of human-computer interfaces, and, more broadly, thefield of humancomputer interaction (HCI) . The course will help develop a solid understanding of the concepts and practices of HCI, and current research topics in human-computer interaction and interfaces.

The site served as a showcase for student designs for, imlementations of, and evaluations of  human-computer systems. Students posted their designs, diagrams and videos of projects to the site, for review and comments by other course participants.

Instructor: Rebecca Fiebrink, Computer Science.

POL351/WWS311: The Politics of Development

2018-06-18T21:35:04+00:00

This course investigates the key political drivers of human development through careful consideration of theory and comparative analysis. Topics include state-building, colonialism, ethnic conflict, global integration, multi-level governance, and global public health.

The site formed a virtual discussion space for readings, talks, and questions about the course content.

Instructor: Evan S. Lieberman, Politics.

WRI196/197: Decoding Dress @ Princeton

2018-06-18T21:32:50+00:00

This Writing seminar examined fashion on “The Street” at Princeton. Students in the course photographed and interviewed fellow students, who explained how their way of dress expressed themselves.

Instructor: Erin Vearncombe, The Writing Center.

CLA360/EAS360: Rome and Han China: A Comparative History

2018-06-18T21:33:07+00:00

Flourishing roughly contemporaneously between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD, Rome and the Han controlled much of the Eurasian landmass. By focusing on common themes (including kingship, administration, society, and material culture), this course draws upon a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to introduce both empires and a core problem in historical enquiry. Unlike most comparative histories, this course also pays close attention to how ancient participants in empire perceived, portrayed, and theorized their worlds, and the ways these ideas shaped the different imperial projects.

This website provides a place for reflection, group work, and analysis of key topics of the course.

Instructor: Tineke D’Haeseleer, East Asian Studies

Lessons, Readings and Dialogues for Persian Language

2018-06-18T21:33:17+00:00

This website presents materials in support of the study of Introductory persian. The lessons were developed by Firoozeh Khazrai of the Near Eastern Studies Department with Paula Hulick of the McGraw center for Teaching and learning.

Venice and the Mediterranean: Crete

2018-06-18T21:36:08+00:00

This project developed out of ART330/HLS331: Venice and the Mediterranean in the Spring of 2007. The course explored the artistic and cultural geography of Venice’s Mediterranean empire, known as the stato da mar, from its beginnings in 1204 to the loss of Crete in 1669. During a 9-day trip to Crete, sponsored by the Program in Hellenic Studies, students discovered a unique cultural palimpsest, with layers of physical remains from the Minoan, Roman, Byzantine, Venetian, and Ottoman periods still visible in the cities and the countryside. The class then collaborated on the construction of the website, using photographs made on the trip and providing commentaries for a defined group of monuments.