WAR, MEMORY AND IDENTITY: A SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO 2015

2018-06-18T21:31:26+00:00

WAR, MEMORY, AND IDENTITY documents a six-week summer program, in partnership with the University of Tokyo, and particularly the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia. With resources and scholars covering the region, and often focusing on different perspectives and questions than those that animate American discussions, the University of Tokyo provides a superb environment for research and study that can contribute to the many junior papers and senior theses each year that deal with these complex issues.

While in Tokyo, students will be in a program led by Dr. Haruko Wakabayashi of Princeton’s East Asian Studies Department, which include weekly seminars held with University of Tokyo students inviting guest lecturers who will discuss their research topics and methods related to the theme of “War, Memory, and Identity.” These seminars are designed to help students build perspectives from a variety of disciplines and develop research questions. Each student will also have the opportunity to meet with and receive feedback from scholars in the field. In addition, the weekly research meetings will tailor discussion to the questions and concerns of individual students. Students will also go on field trips to sites associated with war and memory in Tokyo and in Hiroshima.

Visit: War, Memory and Identity

Surrealism: Sex, Dreams, and Revolution

2018-06-18T21:36:58+00:00

This site was created for a course cross-listed between the Departments of Art and Archeology and French. The students in this course studied the Surrealist movement, and created their own projects, according to Surrealist believes. the projects included an exhibition, a word cloud, a review and remix of several Surrealist classic films, and essays on themes commonly found in Surrealist works and writings. The course was designed and taught by Professor of French and Italian, Efthymia Rentzou.
 

Visit: Surrealism: Sex, Dreams, and Revolution

Princeton Buffer

2018-06-18T21:31:33+00:00

This site is a student-created review of film, television, and popular culture. In the words of its creators:

The Princeton Buffer provides reviews and conversations to advise you on what you should be watching, what’s up with what you’re already watching, or what you should stop watching this instant. We are a group of student film buffs and television nerds who care about providing thoughtful and engaging insights in the voice of our generation. As editors and writers for the Buff, we want to make your precious viewing time better—or at the very least, more fun!

The site was created for Diana Fuss, Louis W. Fairchild ’24 Professor of English. Professor Fuss teaches, among other topics, a course on American Cinema.

 

Visit Princeton Buffer

WRI128/129: Witnessing Disaster

2018-06-18T21:32:06+00:00

Why do audiences tend to experience both fascination and despair when viewing disasters from afar? How does such ambivalence complicate our understanding of the viewer’s ethical responsibility to others? And how should audiences cope with the moral and emotional problems associated with watching real-life tragedies unfold? These questions may seem unique to our hyper-mediated age, but scholars have debated them for centuries.

This course site served as a final writing project for a course on the conventions of academic writing when discussing highly charged topics. Students were invited to create a space on the site that allowed for an emotional response, be it through essay, poetry, music, or other creative endeavor, for the disaster they had already studiedin other more formal writing assignments.

Instructor: Timothy Recuber, The Writing Program.

https://blogs.princeton.edu/witnessingdisaster/

 

 

FRS101: Facebook: The Social Impact of Social Networks

2018-07-19T20:08:02+00:00

This course examines the social impact of social media sites such as Facebook, and how they have changed communication patterns, and expectations of privacy.

Students used the site to comment on course readings, various social networks, and their experience with new forms of social networking.

Instructor: Edward Felten, Center for Information Technology Policy and Computer Science and Public Affairs.

COS436/ELE469: Human-Computer Interface Technology

2018-06-18T21:32:28+00:00

This course introduces hardware and software technologies employed in the creation of human-computer interfaces, and, more broadly, thefield of humancomputer interaction (HCI) . The course will help develop a solid understanding of the concepts and practices of HCI, and current research topics in human-computer interaction and interfaces.

The site served as a showcase for student designs for, imlementations of, and evaluations of  human-computer systems. Students posted their designs, diagrams and videos of projects to the site, for review and comments by other course participants.

Instructor: Rebecca Fiebrink, Computer Science.

POL351/WWS311: The Politics of Development

2018-06-18T21:35:04+00:00

This course investigates the key political drivers of human development through careful consideration of theory and comparative analysis. Topics include state-building, colonialism, ethnic conflict, global integration, multi-level governance, and global public health.

The site formed a virtual discussion space for readings, talks, and questions about the course content.

Instructor: Evan S. Lieberman, Politics.