Local Reporting: Paris as a Case Study

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2017-04-18T00:22:36+00:00

This course examines what makes certain spaces — a multi-ethnic suburb of Paris, a museum, or a building — more controversial or problematic than others. Students produce a body of journalistic work based on historical and archival research, interviews, investigation, and field work in Paris during spring break.

http://commons.princeton.edu/pariscasestudy/

WRI128/129: Witnessing Disaster

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2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

Why do audiences tend to experience both fascination and despair when viewing disasters from afar? How does such ambivalence complicate our understanding of the viewer’s ethical responsibility to others? And how should audiences cope with the moral and emotional problems associated with watching real-life tragedies unfold? These questions may seem unique to our hyper-mediated age, but scholars have debated them for centuries.

This course site served as a final writing project for a course on the conventions of academic writing when discussing highly charged topics. Students were invited to create a space on the site that allowed for an emotional response, be it through essay, poetry, music, or other creative endeavor, for the disaster they had already studiedin other more formal writing assignments.

Instructor: Timothy Recuber, The Writing Program.

https://blogs.princeton.edu/witnessingdisaster/

 

 

COS436/ELE469: Human-Computer Interface Technology

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2017-04-14T18:15:49+00:00

This course introduces hardware and software technologies employed in the creation of human-computer interfaces, and, more broadly, thefield of humancomputer interaction (HCI) . The course will help develop a solid understanding of the concepts and practices of HCI, and current research topics in human-computer interaction and interfaces.

The site served as a showcase for student designs for, imlementations of, and evaluations of  human-computer systems. Students posted their designs, diagrams and videos of projects to the site, for review and comments by other course participants.

Instructor: Rebecca Fiebrink, Computer Science.