Introduction to Chinese Philosophy

2018-07-18T00:22:17+00:00

This course focuses primarily on the Confucian tradition, investigating topics related classical Chinese Philosophy from Confucius through to Hanfeizi, a brief look at Chinese Buddhism, and the development of Song and Ming Dynasty Neo-Confucianism. The webste for Introduction to Chinese Philosophy hosts reading responses in the course and contains additional tools allowing student responses to be made visible to other course participants only after the lecture has occurred.

FRS 177: The World of Noir

2018-06-18T21:39:23+00:00

In the 1940s, pulp magazines and B-films created a new genre, eventually called Noir. On page and screen, hundreds of these crime stories—stark, vivid, and ambiguous—shaped the imagination and self-concept of a world beset by depression and fear. As societies shifted from hot to cold war and grappled with civil rights and urban decay, Noir depicted a dream-like world where morality turns fluid and money sours democracy.

Although the political outlook of Noir ranges widely, its core tension remains: crime and justice are mirror analogues, shadow selves of each other. We map Noir’s rise and spread, examine its treatment of race, class, and gender, and study its triumph as a major cultural style.

Principedia

2018-06-18T21:25:44+00:00

Principedia provides a unique forum within which to realize a fundamental aim of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning: to engage faculty, staff, graduate students and especially undergraduates in systematic reflection and substantive discourse about the practices and processes of learning in Princeton’s distinctive academic environment.

Princeton Geniza Project

2018-06-18T21:26:40+00:00

The Princeton Geniza Project website hosts approximately 4500 TEI-encoded transcriptions of Judeo-Arabic textual fragments. The archive has been used for decades as a scholarly research, teaching, and learning resource.  In 2016, the newly-created Princeton Geniza Lab in Frist Campus Center, is working with staff members from the McGraw Center to update and standardize the database.

HIS278: Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories

2018-07-19T20:02:00+00:00

Students in the Spring 2016, HIS278, Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories course produced digital narratives using ESRI’s online StoryMaps application. Based on recorded interviews conducted by the Historical Society of Princeton, images from the Society’s archives, census records, and digital maps held in Princeton University’s Maps and Geospatial Information Center, these multimedia narratives tell stories about the lives of residents of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood in Princeton.

ABCBooks: ENG385, Children’s Literature

2018-06-18T21:26:56+00:00

The ABC Books project makes available for research and analysis an interactive digital archive of rare children’s alphabet books. The overarching goal of the project is for students not only to interact with the archive but also actively to build and enhance it. With the assistance of staff from the Center for Digital Humanities and the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, this archive was developed for use in ENG 385: Children’s Literature. During the semester students were given opportunities to work with the archive, enhance the metadata associated with items in the archive, and to learn the basics of text encoding.

EAS233: East Asian Humanities

2018-11-30T21:34:52+00:00

The East Asian Studies department’s East Asian Humanities course expands upon a model developed four years ago. In collaboration with staff from the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, faculty members in the department continue to develop an online space that not only presents course materials but also allows students augment course readings with multimedia annotations of their own. Teams of students also developed digital projects such as timelines, interactive narratives, and digital maps.