Local Reporting: Paris as a Case Study

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This course examines what makes certain spaces — a multi-ethnic suburb of Paris, a museum, or a building — more controversial or problematic than others. Students produce a body of journalistic work based on historical and archival research, interviews, investigation, and field work in Paris during spring break.

http://commons.princeton.edu/pariscasestudy/

other futures: a virtual exhibition space

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This creative-collaborative assignment is meant to give students an opportunity to engage critically with visual art and explore the ways it has been put to use to both re-frame and re-conceptualize the Caribbean’s catastrophic history. By coming together around the work of one of the Caribbean artists recently featured in the Small Axe Visual Life of Catastrophe project, students are asked to think about limits and potentials of visualizing disaster through art. How might the visual arts help us see history with new eyes? In what ways do these artistic works call upon us to look at our present differently—perhaps, not just as a moment in time but as the remains of an unending catastrophe? How might both of these practices of seeing and looking compel us towards a new kind of response, a new notion of responsibility or, even, an ethics that is informed by the unimaginable atrocities that still haunt our everyday life?

History Beyond the Written Word: Unconventional Historical Sources and The Historian’s Craft

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In History Beyond the Written Word: Unconventional Historical Sources and The Historian’s Craft. History 278 (Spring 2015), students conducted oral history interviews and collected other materials, researching history using  unconventional sources.

FRS 177: The World of Noir

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In the 1940s, pulp magazines and B-films created a new genre, eventually called Noir. On page and screen, hundreds of these crime stories—stark, vivid, and ambiguous—shaped the imagination and self-concept of a world beset by depression and fear. As societies shifted from hot to cold war and grappled with civil rights and urban decay, Noir depicted a dream-like world where morality turns fluid and money sours democracy.

Although the political outlook of Noir ranges widely, its core tension remains: crime and justice are mirror analogues, shadow selves of each other. We map Noir’s rise and spread, examine its treatment of race, class, and gender, and study its triumph as a major cultural style.

AAS 341 ART 375: Enter the New Negro: Black Atlantic

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Born in the late 1800s, the New Negro movement demanded political equality, desegregation, and an end to lynching, while also launching new forms of international Black cultural expression. The visionary modernity of its artists not only reimagined the history of the black diaspora by developing new artistic languages through travel, music, religion and poetry, but also shaped modernism as a whole in the 20th century. Incorporating field trips and sessions in the Princeton University Art Museum, this course explores Afro-modern forms of artistic expression from the late 19th-century into the mid-20th century.

URB 202: The Trenton Project

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The Trenton Project is a collaborative documentary investigation by the Princeton University course, Documentary Film and the City.

http://www.thetrentonproject.com/

Principedia

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Principedia provides a unique forum within which to realize a fundamental aim of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning: to engage faculty, staff, graduate students and especially undergraduates in systematic reflection and substantive discourse about the practices and processes of learning in Princeton’s distinctive academic environment.

HIS278: Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories

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Students in the Spring 2016, HIS278, Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories course produced digital narratives using ESRI’s online StoryMaps application. Based on recorded interviews conducted by the Historical Society of Princeton, images from the Society’s archives, census records, and digital maps held in Princeton University’s Maps and Geospatial Information Center, these multimedia narratives tell stories about the lives of residents of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood in Princeton.

Levantine Colloquial Arabic

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The Levantine Colloquial Arabic site facilitates the study of Arabic through three popular Arabic-language films.  The site includes clips from the films, associated vocabulary lists, and transcriptions.

EAS233: East Asian Humanities

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During the Fall of 2016, students in the East Asian Studies department’s East Asian Humanities course will expand upon a model developed three years ago. In collaboration with staff from the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, faculty members in the department developed an online space that not only presents course materials but also allows students augment course readings with multimedia annotations of their own. Teams of students also developed digital projects such as timelines, interactive narratives, and digital maps.

Mapping NYC Modernism: Literature and Art History

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One-term project for visiting (Department of English) Professor David Ball, ’07, Dickinson College. Features student-created maps and entries to create an overview of New York modernism between 1890 and 1940.

 

 

Visit: Mapping NYC Modernism