People, Nature, and the Environment

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2017-04-13T18:09:39+00:00

A six-week summer program at the University of Tokyo (UT) is designed specifically for rising juniors and seniors who are preparing to begin their research for their junior papers and senior theses. The program includes: weekly seminars with UT students by guest lecturers on topics and methods related to the theme of “Nature and the Environment;” weekly meetings with the instructor on individual research; and field trips to sites associated with nature and environment in and around Tokyo. Students may also audit courses offered in English at UT. During the final week of the program, the group will take a trip to the Tohoku region, traditionally known for its rich landscape, as represented in the works of the haiku poet Matsuo Basho, writer Miyazawa Kenji, and folklorist Yanagita Kunio. We will also visit sites and local organizations to study the environmental, social, and economic repercussions of the massive earthquake/tsunami of 2011 and the Fukushima nuclear disaster. The site was created for Professor Haruko Wakabayashi, Researcher and visiting faculty member, Department of East Asian Studies.

 

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Komonjo

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2017-04-13T18:10:21+00:00

This website introduces four document collections in interactive formats for teaching and study. The first, Not So Secret Secrets, explores the elaborate safeguards for ensuring that Uesugi Kenshin could know that a gunpowder recipe that he received was in fact from the shogun. These documents also reveal the rapidity of transmission of Portuguese knowledge, and show the subtle social distinctions that are evident in these records. The second, The Emperor’s Clothes, provides four generations of documents relating to a particular incident where Awazu Kiyonori rescued the imperial wardrobe. Originally a low ranking noble, this act of valor allowed his great grandson to enter the lowest echelon of the court nobility. The third, The Better Part of Valor, reproduces six documents in the Migita collection that reveals how they were called to battle and fought for both sides in a civil war in the fourth and fifth months of 1333. A fourth section, The Shogun’s Mother, reproduces a 1338 letter by Uesugi Kiyoko (Seishi), the mother of the first Ashikaga shogun, who witnessed a decisive battle. Such letters rarely survive, and the condition of this record makes it challenging to read. The site was created by Thomas Conlan, Professor of East Asian Studies and History, and is used as a teaching tool for students, who translated and annotated the document collections.

 

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Surrealism: Sex, Dreams, and Revolution

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2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

This site was created for a course cross-listed between the Departments of Art and Archeology and French. The students in this course studied the Surrealist movement, and created their own projects, according to Surrealist believes. the projects included an exhibition, a word cloud, a review and remix of several Surrealist classic films, and essays on themes commonly found in Surrealist works and writings. The course was designed and taught by Professor of French and Italian, Efthymia Rentzou.
 

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Princeton Buffer

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2017-04-13T18:12:04+00:00

This site is a student-created review of film, television, and popular culture. In the words of its creators:

The Princeton Buffer provides reviews and conversations to advise you on what you should be watching, what’s up with what you’re already watching, or what you should stop watching this instant. We are a group of student film buffs and television nerds who care about providing thoughtful and engaging insights in the voice of our generation. As editors and writers for the Buff, we want to make your precious viewing time better—or at the very least, more fun!

The site was created for Diana Fuss, Louis W. Fairchild ’24 Professor of English. Professor Fuss teaches, among other topics, a course on American Cinema.

 

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COS436/ELE469: Human-Computer Interface Technology

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2017-04-14T18:15:49+00:00

This course introduces hardware and software technologies employed in the creation of human-computer interfaces, and, more broadly, thefield of humancomputer interaction (HCI) . The course will help develop a solid understanding of the concepts and practices of HCI, and current research topics in human-computer interaction and interfaces.

The site served as a showcase for student designs for, imlementations of, and evaluations of  human-computer systems. Students posted their designs, diagrams and videos of projects to the site, for review and comments by other course participants.

Instructor: Rebecca Fiebrink, Computer Science.

POL351/WWS311: The Politics of Development

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2017-04-14T17:59:29+00:00

This course investigates the key political drivers of human development through careful consideration of theory and comparative analysis. Topics include state-building, colonialism, ethnic conflict, global integration, multi-level governance, and global public health.

The site formed a virtual discussion space for readings, talks, and questions about the course content.

Instructor: Evan S. Lieberman, Politics.

WRI196/197: Decoding Dress @ Princeton

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2017-04-14T21:28:22+00:00

This Writing seminar examined fashion on “The Street” at Princeton. Students in the course photographed and interviewed fellow students, who explained how their way of dress expressed themselves.

Instructor: Erin Vearncombe, The Writing Center.

CLA360/EAS360: Rome and Han China: A Comparative History

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2017-04-18T00:02:36+00:00

Flourishing roughly contemporaneously between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD, Rome and the Han controlled much of the Eurasian landmass. By focusing on common themes (including kingship, administration, society, and material culture), this course draws upon a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to introduce both empires and a core problem in historical enquiry. Unlike most comparative histories, this course also pays close attention to how ancient participants in empire perceived, portrayed, and theorized their worlds, and the ways these ideas shaped the different imperial projects.

This website provides a place for reflection, group work, and analysis of key topics of the course.

Instructor: Tineke D’Haeseleer, East Asian Studies

Lessons, Readings and Dialogues for Persian Language

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2017-04-19T00:06:26+00:00

This website presents materials in support of the study of Introductory persian. The lessons were developed by Firoozeh Khazrai of the Near Eastern Studies Department with Paula Hulick of the McGraw center for Teaching and learning.

Mapping the Golden Age of Venice

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2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

This interactive map encapsulates work done by the students of Art 440, Venice in its Golden Age, Fall 2007. The aim of this interdisciplinary seminar was to explore the art and architecture of Renaissance Venice in the context of its rich cultural heritage and unique political and social system.