FRS 177: The World of Noir

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2017-10-27T23:05:20+00:00

In the 1940s, pulp magazines and B-films created a new genre, eventually called Noir. On page and screen, hundreds of these crime stories—stark, vivid, and ambiguous—shaped the imagination and self-concept of a world beset by depression and fear. As societies shifted from hot to cold war and grappled with civil rights and urban decay, Noir depicted a dream-like world where morality turns fluid and money sours democracy.

Although the political outlook of Noir ranges widely, its core tension remains: crime and justice are mirror analogues, shadow selves of each other. We map Noir’s rise and spread, examine its treatment of race, class, and gender, and study its triumph as a major cultural style.

Principedia

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2017-10-03T01:40:48+00:00

Principedia provides a unique forum within which to realize a fundamental aim of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning: to engage faculty, staff, graduate students and especially undergraduates in systematic reflection and substantive discourse about the practices and processes of learning in Princeton’s distinctive academic environment.

Playing Soviet: The Visual Languages of Early Soviet Children’s Books, 1917-1953

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2017-10-03T01:40:57+00:00

The Playing Soviet website presents an interactive database of children’s book illustrations drawn from little-known and rarely-seen Soviet children’s books from the collection of the Cotsen Collection at Princeton’s Firestone Library. The website supports image annotation, allowing students to contribute to the site, and data exports, enabling the development of data visualizations based on information in the archive.

Aprendo, an online textbook for Spanish 101, 102, 103 & 107

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2017-10-03T01:20:07+00:00

Aprendo is an online textbook developed during 2016 for use in Spanish 101, 102, 103, and 107. Students have access to multimedia course materials and complete exercises online.

HIS278: Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories

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2017-10-03T01:41:28+00:00

Students in the Spring 2016, HIS278, Digital, Spatial, Visual and Oral Histories course produced digital narratives using ESRI’s online StoryMaps application. Based on recorded interviews conducted by the Historical Society of Princeton, images from the Society’s archives, census records, and digital maps held in Princeton University’s Maps and Geospatial Information Center, these multimedia narratives tell stories about the lives of residents of the Witherspoon-Jackson neighborhood in Princeton.

ABCBooks: ENG385, Children’s Literature

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2017-10-03T01:41:36+00:00

The ABC Books project makes available for research and analysis an interactive digital archive of rare children’s alphabet books. The overarching goal of the project is for students not only to interact with the archive but also actively to build and enhance it. With the assistance of staff from the Center for Digital Humanities and the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, this archive was developed for use in ENG 385: Children’s Literature. During the semester students were given opportunities to work with the archive, enhance the metadata associated with items in the archive, and to learn the basics of text encoding.

EAS233: East Asian Humanities

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2017-10-27T22:27:33+00:00

The East Asian Studies department’s East Asian Humanities course expands upon a model developed four years ago. In collaboration with staff from the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, faculty members in the department continue to develop an online space that not only presents course materials but also allows students augment course readings with multimedia annotations of their own. Teams of students also developed digital projects such as timelines, interactive narratives, and digital maps.

DerDieDas: a textbook for introductory German

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2017-10-03T01:20:37+00:00

DerDieDas is an online introductory German textbook focusing on the 1200 most frequently-used words in the German language. The textbook is in use in the German 101 and 102 courses at Princeton. Staff members from the McGraw Center assisted in the development and use of the original prototype of the platform used in the 2014-2015 academic year.

People, Nature, and the Environment

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2017-10-03T01:27:18+00:00

A six-week summer program at the University of Tokyo (UT) is designed specifically for rising juniors and seniors who are preparing to begin their research for their junior papers and senior theses. The program includes: weekly seminars with UT students by guest lecturers on topics and methods related to the theme of “Nature and the Environment;” weekly meetings with the instructor on individual research; and field trips to sites associated with nature and environment in and around Tokyo. Students may also audit courses offered in English at UT. During the final week of the program, the group will take a trip to the Tohoku region, traditionally known for its rich landscape, as represented in the works of the haiku poet Matsuo Basho, writer Miyazawa Kenji, and folklorist Yanagita Kunio. We will also visit sites and local organizations to study the environmental, social, and economic repercussions of the massive earthquake/tsunami of 2011 and the Fukushima nuclear disaster. The site was created for Professor Haruko Wakabayashi, Researcher and visiting faculty member, Department of East Asian Studies.

 

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Komonjo

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2017-10-03T01:20:46+00:00

This website introduces four document collections in interactive formats for teaching and study. The first, Not So Secret Secrets, explores the elaborate safeguards for ensuring that Uesugi Kenshin could know that a gunpowder recipe that he received was in fact from the shogun. These documents also reveal the rapidity of transmission of Portuguese knowledge, and show the subtle social distinctions that are evident in these records. The second, The Emperor’s Clothes, provides four generations of documents relating to a particular incident where Awazu Kiyonori rescued the imperial wardrobe. Originally a low ranking noble, this act of valor allowed his great grandson to enter the lowest echelon of the court nobility. The third, The Better Part of Valor, reproduces six documents in the Migita collection that reveals how they were called to battle and fought for both sides in a civil war in the fourth and fifth months of 1333. A fourth section, The Shogun’s Mother, reproduces a 1338 letter by Uesugi Kiyoko (Seishi), the mother of the first Ashikaga shogun, who witnessed a decisive battle. Such letters rarely survive, and the condition of this record makes it challenging to read. The site was created by Thomas Conlan, Professor of East Asian Studies and History, and is used as a teaching tool for students, who translated and annotated the document collections.

 

Visit: Komonjo

Surrealism: Sex, Dreams, and Revolution

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2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

This site was created for a course cross-listed between the Departments of Art and Archeology and French. The students in this course studied the Surrealist movement, and created their own projects, according to Surrealist believes. the projects included an exhibition, a word cloud, a review and remix of several Surrealist classic films, and essays on themes commonly found in Surrealist works and writings. The course was designed and taught by Professor of French and Italian, Efthymia Rentzou.
 

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Princeton Buffer

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2017-10-03T01:20:54+00:00

This site is a student-created review of film, television, and popular culture. In the words of its creators:

The Princeton Buffer provides reviews and conversations to advise you on what you should be watching, what’s up with what you’re already watching, or what you should stop watching this instant. We are a group of student film buffs and television nerds who care about providing thoughtful and engaging insights in the voice of our generation. As editors and writers for the Buff, we want to make your precious viewing time better—or at the very least, more fun!

The site was created for Diana Fuss, Louis W. Fairchild ’24 Professor of English. Professor Fuss teaches, among other topics, a course on American Cinema.

 

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