FRS 177: The World of Noir

, , , ,

2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

In the 1940s, pulp magazines and B-films created a new genre, eventually called Noir. On page and screen, hundreds of these crime stories—stark, vivid, and ambiguous—shaped the imagination and self-concept of a world beset by depression and fear. As societies shifted from hot to cold war and grappled with civil rights and urban decay, Noir depicted a dream-like world where morality turns fluid and money sours democracy.

Although the political outlook of Noir ranges widely, its core tension remains: crime and justice are mirror analogues, shadow selves of each other. We map Noir’s rise and spread, examine its treatment of race, class, and gender, and study its triumph as a major cultural style.

FRS101: Facebook: The Social Impact of Social Networks

, , ,

2017-04-14T21:23:10+00:00

This course examines the social impact of social media sites such as Facebook, and how they have changed communication patterns, and expectations of privacy.

Students used the site to comment on course readings, various social networks, and their experience with new forms of social networking.

Instructor: Edward Felten, Center for Information Technology Policy and Computer Science and Public Affairs.