other futures: a virtual exhibition space

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2017-10-03T01:26:01+00:00

This creative-collaborative assignment is meant to give students an opportunity to engage critically with visual art and explore the ways it has been put to use to both re-frame and re-conceptualize the Caribbean’s catastrophic history. By coming together around the work of one of the Caribbean artists recently featured in the Small Axe Visual Life of Catastrophe project, students are asked to think about limits and potentials of visualizing disaster through art. How might the visual arts help us see history with new eyes? In what ways do these artistic works call upon us to look at our present differently—perhaps, not just as a moment in time but as the remains of an unending catastrophe? How might both of these practices of seeing and looking compel us towards a new kind of response, a new notion of responsibility or, even, an ethics that is informed by the unimaginable atrocities that still haunt our everyday life?

FRS 177: The World of Noir

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2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

In the 1940s, pulp magazines and B-films created a new genre, eventually called Noir. On page and screen, hundreds of these crime stories—stark, vivid, and ambiguous—shaped the imagination and self-concept of a world beset by depression and fear. As societies shifted from hot to cold war and grappled with civil rights and urban decay, Noir depicted a dream-like world where morality turns fluid and money sours democracy.

Although the political outlook of Noir ranges widely, its core tension remains: crime and justice are mirror analogues, shadow selves of each other. We map Noir’s rise and spread, examine its treatment of race, class, and gender, and study its triumph as a major cultural style.

ABCBooks: ENG385, Children’s Literature

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2017-10-03T01:41:36+00:00

The ABC Books project makes available for research and analysis an interactive digital archive of rare children’s alphabet books. The overarching goal of the project is for students not only to interact with the archive but also actively to build and enhance it. With the assistance of staff from the Center for Digital Humanities and the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, this archive was developed for use in ENG 385: Children’s Literature. During the semester students were given opportunities to work with the archive, enhance the metadata associated with items in the archive, and to learn the basics of text encoding.

Mapping NYC Modernism: Literature and Art History

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2017-10-03T01:27:14+00:00

One-term project for visiting (Department of English) Professor David Ball, ’07, Dickinson College. Features student-created maps and entries to create an overview of New York modernism between 1890 and 1940.

 

 

Visit: Mapping NYC Modernism

Surrealism: Sex, Dreams, and Revolution

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2017-05-20T00:14:03+00:00

This site was created for a course cross-listed between the Departments of Art and Archeology and French. The students in this course studied the Surrealist movement, and created their own projects, according to Surrealist believes. the projects included an exhibition, a word cloud, a review and remix of several Surrealist classic films, and essays on themes commonly found in Surrealist works and writings. The course was designed and taught by Professor of French and Italian, Efthymia Rentzou.
 

Visit: Surrealism: Sex, Dreams, and Revolution

Princeton Buffer

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2017-10-03T01:20:54+00:00

This site is a student-created review of film, television, and popular culture. In the words of its creators:

The Princeton Buffer provides reviews and conversations to advise you on what you should be watching, what’s up with what you’re already watching, or what you should stop watching this instant. We are a group of student film buffs and television nerds who care about providing thoughtful and engaging insights in the voice of our generation. As editors and writers for the Buff, we want to make your precious viewing time better—or at the very least, more fun!

The site was created for Diana Fuss, Louis W. Fairchild ’24 Professor of English. Professor Fuss teaches, among other topics, a course on American Cinema.

 

Visit Princeton Buffer