OtherFutures 2018, An introduction to modern Caribbean literature

2018-07-18T00:15:55+00:00

This course introduces students to major theories and debates within the study of Caribbean literature and culture with a particular focus on the idea of catastrophe. Reading novels and poetry that address the historical loss and injustices that have given shape to the modern Caribbean, students explore questions of race, gender, and sexuality and pay considerable attention to the figure of the black body caught in the crosscurrents of a catastrophic history. A course website serves as a virtual exhibition space for the course.

Listening to Colonial Latin America

2018-07-18T00:18:14+00:00

This course begins with the origins and consolidation of the Aztec, Inca and Iberian polities and ends with the severance of colonial ties. It combines an overview of the political economy of the region over three centuries with a study of how social groups interacted among themselves and with imperial rule over time through accommodation and conflict.

Borderland: Reporting on the front lines of history in Greece

2018-07-27T01:05:40+00:00

In June and July 2017,  students traveled to Athens and the island of Lesbos, notebooks and cameras in hand, to serve as eyewitnesses at a pivotal moment in world affairs. Their challenging assignment: Produce a compelling and rigorous first rough draft of history.

http://commons.princeton.edu/globalreporting2017/

Migration Reporting: Manitoba

2018-07-18T00:10:14+00:00

This seminar will focus on journalism and the global migration crisis, as more than 65 million people are on the move, with forced displacements at a record high. At the same time, refugee resettlement in the United States is contentious. This course examines journalism’s approach to the crisis in photos, text, and radio, considering the conflict between national security, international responsibility, and America’s historic role in resettlement.

Architecture, Globalization and the Environment

2018-06-18T21:21:17+00:00

Art 250, Architecture, Globalization, and the Environment, analyzes contemporary architecture and its relation to climate change, urbanism, and consequent social problems. Special attention is paid to the erosion of public space, whether due to gentrification, gated communities, outright segregation, or to the devastating impact of war in urban zones in many parts of the world.

Introduction to Asian-American Studies: Race, War, Decolonization

2018-08-29T19:44:23+00:00

This course offers an introduction to Asian American studies centered on the issues of “race,” “privilege,” and “power” from the premise that multiple racial projects—including Orientalism, Islamophobia, anti-Black racism, and settler colonialism—contribute to Asian racial formation, and that warfare plays a central role in these projects. With a focus on militarism in the US, Asia, and the Pacific region, the class explores the intersections of race, Indigeneity, and class as well as possibilities for making connections across variegated groups. Exploring Asian Americanism through archives, personal narratives, and other texts, the course focuses on the role of history in producing current conditions and our understandings of them.